Webinar Series

2017 Webinar Series - Building Better Plants for the 21st Century: Updates and Upgrades in HTP, IP and DNA

 March 1 - Dr. Kevin Price, Executive Vice President of R& D, AgPixel, LLC

                 View slides from presentation: "How Can Ultra-High Resolution Drone Imagery be Acquired and Used for High Throughput Plant Phenotyping"

 March 15 - Dr. Julie Dawson, Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin-Madison

                 View slides form presentation: "Findings from the Summit on Intellectual Property Rights and Public Plant Breeding"

 March 29 - Dr. Russell Jessup, Perennial Grass Breeding, Texas A&M University

 April 12 - Dr. Philipp Simon, Carrot and Garlic Genetics, USDA-ARS, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 April 26 - Dr. Jim Myers, Vegetable Breeding and Genetics, Oregon State University

 May 10 - Dr. Fred Allen, Soybean Breeding & Variety Trials, University of Tennessee 

 

 

2016 Webinar Series - Science of Crop Improvement

 

March 2, 2016 - Stephen Baenziger, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

March 16, 2016 - David Byrne, Texas A&M University

March 30, 2016 - Larry Grauke, USDA-ARS

April 6, 2016 - Kevin Murphy, Washington State University

April 13, 2016 - Michael Havey, USDA-ARS

April 20, 2016 - Arron Carter, Washington State University

2015 Webinar Series - The Science of Selections

Have you ever wondered about the science that went into making the carrot you’re munching on so crunchy? Or making your chrysanthemum blooms really pop? The NAPB, in collaboration with the PBCC and PBGWorks, has developed an annual webinar series to showcase the broad range of plant species and plant breeding efforts being implemented. Plant breeding is the process through which new genetic variation is created and subsequently selected upon to develop new varieties of crops. Just as there are many different plants undergoing plant breeding efforts, there are equally as many techniques, methods, and technologies used within each crop. Whether you are a plant breeder, a technician in a breeding program, a graduate student, or someone interested in agriculture and plants, we hope you will find these presentations interesting and informative.

 

To begin the registration process, click on the topic of interest in the title column and you will be directed to a new page. Here you will find more information pertaining to the webinar, including date and time, as well as the register now button. To register, click the register now button and you will be guided through the registration process. Each webinar requires a separate registration so make sure to register for each topic that interests you.

April 1, 2015 - Johnie Jenkins, USDA ARS, "Cotton: From Depression Era Mules to the Moon and Back"

April 8, 2015 - Pat Moore, Washington State University, "Raspberry Breeding for the Pacific Northwest"

April 15, 2015 - Neil Anderson, University of Minnesota, "From Lilies to Gladiolus: Flower Power"

April 22, 2015 - Mitch McGrath, Michigan State University, "Sugarbeet Genetics, Genomics and Germplasm Enhancement"

May 6, 2015 - Seth Murray, Texas A&M University, "Plant Breeding Approaches and Technologies for Challenges in Agriculture: A view from a Texas Maize Breeding Program"

May 13, 2015 - Istvan Rajcan, University of Guelph, "Soybeans: Way more than just nice yellow seeds"

May 20, 2015 - Barry Tillman, University of Florida, "Breeding Peanuts: The story of a lowly groundnut"

2014 Webinar Series - How to breed new plant varieties: imagining and engineering crops

David Francis, Ohio State University, "A recipe for the perfect salsa tomato"

Jim Myers, Ohio State University, "Putting the snap back in snap peas"

Michael Mazourek, Cornell University, "Cuckoo for cucurbit vine crop breeding"

Walter de Jong, Cornell University, "Get the dirt on potato breeding"

Kevin Murphy, Washington State University, "Keen on quinoa breeding"

Kate Evans, Washington State University, "Making appealing apples"

James Kelly, Michigan State University, "Dry bean breeding isn't a dry topic"

Kevin Crosby, Texas A&M University, "Peppers are the most important part of salsa"

tomatoes